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September is National Animal Pain Awareness Month.


There are many issues that cause pain in our pets, such as: Intervertebral Disc Disease, Cruciate Injury, Pancreatitis, Cancer, Periodontal Disease, Muscle Strain, and Bladder Infection. However, Osteoarthritis
is widespread among our pets. Research has shown that 20% of all dogs over the age of one year have some form of arthritis. In cats over the age of six, 61% have arthritis in at least one joint and 48% have
arthritis in 2 or more joints.


Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease or arthritis. It is characterized by inflammation of the joint capsule, wearing of the joint cartilage, thinning of the joint fluid, and production of new bone
around the joint. The results of this are a decrease in mobility, function, enjoyment of life and increase in pain.


Age is not a disease! The chronic pain of arthritis can be subtle and a lot of times it is written off as "getting old" or "just slowing down with age". Dogs and cats can easily hide or mask their chronic pain.
They do not show their pain in a way most humans expect them to, they most likely will not cry, whine or yelp out in pain.


Common Signs of Chronic Pain in Dogs
Decreased social interaction
Anxious expression
Submissive behavior
Refusal to move
Guarding behavior
Aggression; biting
Decreased appetite
Self-mutilation (chewing)
Changes in posture


Common Signs of Pain in Cats
Reduced activity
Loss of appetite
Quiet/loss of curiosity
Changes in urinary/defecation habits
Lack of agility/jumping
Excessive licking/grooming
Stiff posture/gait
Guarding behavior
Tail flicking


Diagnosing the cause and location of pain depends on a thorough evaluation by a qualified veterinarian, who will use a good pain scoring system, palpation of all joints and muscles, and possibly diagnostic
imaging such as X rays or an MRI. Arthritis is a progressive painful disease, so the earlier we catch it in life, the better off your pet will be. 

Treatment options to help painful cats and dogs.
STEM CELL THERAPY: Stem cells are used to treat arthritis in dogs, cats, and horses by reducing pain and inflammation. Your pet’s quality of life will be restored with an increased range of motion and regeneration of tendons, ligaments, and bone. Ongoing research shows promise for treating intervertebral disc disease, liver disease, and kidney disease.

PLATELET RICH PLASMA: How does platelet therapy work? The scientific answer is that platelets activate by exposure to damaged tissue, releasing their granular contents which include anabolic growth
factors. These growth factors help attract progenitor cells to the injury site and play a key role in stimulating tissue repair through fibroblast expansion and cellular matrix production. In other, less
technical terms, when the concentrated platelets are injected into the site of damaged tissue, the platelets signal additional healing cells to migrate to the affected area to begin the process of tissue
repair.

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-ACUPUNCTURE: Acupuncture enhances blood circulation, nervous system stimulation, and the release of anti-inflammatory & pain-relieving hormones.
INTRAMUSCULAR DRY NEEDLING: Dry needling relieves muscle pain with the insertion of a needle into the skin at a myofascial trigger point. The myofascial trigger point is related to the production and
maintenance of the pain cycle. When punctured by the needle, the pain will subside.


SHOCKWAVE THERAPY: Shock wave treatment uses high-energy sound waves to trigger the body’s own repair mechanisms. This non-invasive form of therapy decreases lameness, pain, and inflammation
and encourages the healing of bones and cartilage. It will improve your pet’s quality of life through increased blood flow and a reduced need for non-steroidal anti-inflammatories. Shock Wave Therapy
has even been used in human medicine for over 20 years.


UNDERWATER TREADMILL TRAINING: The buoyancy of walking in water limits the impact on the joints while promoting muscle strength and tone and joint motion. Even dogs that cannot stand on their
own on land, can usually stand in water. This therapy can be beneficial in rehabilitation of fractures, cruciate surgery, neurologic conditions including degenerative myelopathy and disc disease, tendinitis,
weight loss and other disorders where the pet is reluctant to use the limb or there is lack of strength.


PHYSICAL THERAPY: Physical Therapy in veterinary medicine utilizes techniques to increase function and mobility of joints and muscles in animals. Animal rehabilitation can reduce pain and enhance
recovery from injury, surgery, degenerative diseases, age-related diseases, and obesity.


Now is the time to contact your veterinarian to see how they can help your cat or dog lead a better life with less pain. If you do not have a veterinarian that can help you out, you can search for a Pain
Practitioner near you through the International Veterinary of Pain Management. IVAPM is the leading forum and educational resource for veterinary professionals and pet owners interested in animal pain
prevention, management, and treatment. Visit IVAPM.ORG and click on the link at the top "Find an IVAPM Member" and you will be connected to a veterinarian that is dedicated to helping pets get pain
relief.

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Reggie had PRP therapy and had a complete recovery from a medial shoulder injury. He will once again compete in Dock Diving.

What is Platelet Therapy

Platelet therapy falls under the umbrella of Regenerative Medicine.  Regenerative Medicine is a broad term for innovative medical therapies that will enable the body to repair, replace, restore, and regenerate damaged or diseased tissues.  In essence, platelet therapy stimulates the body’s natural cells to help promote healing.  The most common term for platelet therapy is “platelet-rich plasma” or PRP.  This term has been used loosely to describe solutions where the platelet concentration is higher than that found in whole blood.  Platelet therapy has long been used in both human and veterinary medicine however only in the last decade have there been randomized controlled studies (1).  Platelets are a component of blood and have been identified as a major source of growth factors.  These growth factors can aid in healing and have been studied for the treatment of wounds, osteoarthritis, and pain.

                              

How does Platelet Therapy Work

The process begins with a blood collection.  Your veterinarian will collect blood from your dog, cat, or horse, and will utilize a specialized platelet therapy collection kit to concentrate your pet’s platelets.  There are two methods to concentrate platelets: centrifuge spinning and gravity filtration.  Only one system on the market uses gravity filtration (1): the Pall V-PET™.  The rest use some version of centrifugal force. One potential advantage of using a gravity filtration system is more growth factors are left intact in the final platelet concentrate (5).

Once the platelet concentrate is produced, it can be injected directly into an injury site (surface wound or soft tissue injury such as a damaged cruciate ligament) or an arthritic joint.  When introduced to the site of injury/inflammation, the platelets activate to release their granular contents which include anabolic growth factors.  These growth factors help attract progenitor cells to the injury site and play a key role in stimulating tissue repair through fibroblast expansion and cellular matrix production.  In other, less technical terms, when the concentrated platelets are exposed to the damaged tissue, the platelets signal additional healing cells to migrate to the affected area to begin the process of tissue repair.

 

Common Platelet Therapy Applications

Wound healing

Complicated wound healing is a common problem seen in veterinary medicine.  Occasionally, wounds can become chronic and non-healing.  Often, these wounds do not respond to traditional therapies and require routine and potentially expensive medical management.  Platelet therapy, when administered directly into a wound site, functions as a tissue sealant.  The platelets initiate wound repair by releasing the aforementioned growth factors (2).  Platelet therapy can be utilized for surgical wounds such as surgical incisions as well as for traumatic wounds.  Below is a picture of a chronic, non-healing wound on the amputated stump of a dog named Pearl.  Pearl had a prosthetic leg that was rubbing excessively and caused this wound.  On the left is a picture before treatment with platelet therapy.  On the right is a picture 10 weeks after treatment utilizing the V-PET™ platelet therapy kit.

 

Osteoarthritis

Platelet therapy has also been studied in the treatment of osteoarthritis.  When the platelet concentrate is delivered via intra-articular injection (directly into the joint), the platelets are exposed to inflamed joint tissue.  This causes them to release their growth factors which may promote healing (3).  In a randomized blinded study evaluating the use of V-PET™ as intra-articular therapy in chronic canine OA, results suggested that a single intra-articular injection of platelet concentrate resulted in significant improvement.

 

Soft Tissue Injury/Cruciate Ligament Tear

In the same way platelets aid the healing of joint tissues, they can promote healing when exposed to injured soft tissue such as torn cruciate ligaments.  In two case reports utilizing the V-PET™ platelet therapy kit, two dogs with injured cruciate ligaments received injections of platelet concentrate into their injured knee.  Both dogs went from non-weight bearing on the injured leg to walking on all fours and resuming their normal activities.  This same therapy can be used with medial shoulder injuries as well.

 

Pain

In a recent human study, platelet therapy appeared to be more effective in controlling pain in patients with knee OA compared with other injections including saline placebo, hyaluronic acid, ozone, and steroids(4).

 

Summary

Platelets can be obtained and concentrated relatively quickly in your veterinarian’s office.  These concentrated platelets can be administered locally where needed to aid in wound healing and to encourage regeneration of damaged tissues.  Platelet therapy can serve as an alternative to potentially harmful medications, surgery, and complicated medical management.

 

References

 

1.         Fahie M, Girolamo A, Guercio V, Schaffer J, Johnston G, Au J, et al. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of autologous platelet therapy for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc (2013) 243(9):1291-7.


2.         Lacci KM, Dardik A. Platelet-rich plasma: support for its use in wound healing. The Yale journal of biology and medicine (2010) 83(1):1-9. PubMed PMID: 20351977; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2844688.


3.         Fortier LA, Barker JU, Strauss EJ, McCarrel TM, Cole BJ. The role of growth factors in cartilage repair. Clinical orthopaedics and related research (2011) 469(10):2706-15. doi: 10.1007/s11999-011-1857-3. PubMed PMID: 21403984; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3171543.


4.         Shen L, Yuan T, Chen S, Xie X, Zhang C. The temporal effect of platelet-rich plasma on pain and physical function in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of orthopaedic surgery and research (2017) 12(1):16. doi: 10.1186/s13018-017-0521-3. PubMed PMID: 28115016; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5260061.

5.         Hessel LN1, Bosh G, van Weeren PR, Ionita JC. Equine autologous platelet concentrates: A comparative study between different available systems. Equine Vet J. 2015 May;47(3):319-25. doi: 10.1111/evj.12288. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

 

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DOG ELBOW PAIN TRIAL

A clinical research study focusing on pain management in dogs living with osteoarthritis of the elbow

 

What is the Dog Elbow Pain Trial?

This clinical trial aims to confirm the effectiveness and safety of a new medicine to control pain associated with osteoarthritis of the elbow in dogs. If your dog qualifies for this study, you should expect to stay in the study for 90 days and have 7 scheduled visits with the veterinarian conducting the study. You will also be required to provide weekly behavioral assessments of your dog.

Because this is a study that is intended to support the drug’s approval, it needs to be “controlled”. This means some dogs receive treatment and others undergo the preparation and everything leading up to an injection of the medication, but do not actually receive the medication being tested. This study is also “blinded” or “masked,” meaning neither you nor the veterinarian making observations will know if your dog received the treatment or not until the end of the study. All owners of untreated dogs will be given an opportunity at the end of the study for their dogs to receive the investigational treatment at no charge.

Does my dog qualify?

Your dog may qualify if it:

  • Is at least 1 year old.
  • Weighs more than 11 pounds.
  • Has a confirmed diagnosis of elbow pain due to osteoarthritis that impacts its’ mobility and quality of life.

Other study criteria may apply. The veterinary investigator will decide if your dog is a good candidate for this study.

If qualified, your dog would receive (at no cost to you):

  • Investigational medicine or the procedure without injection of the medication.
  • Study-related exams and tests.
  • Time with a local veterinarian.

Is it safe to enroll my dog in this study?
Over 200 dogs have been treated in safety studies, including client owned dogs with elbow pain. This study is primarily focused on confirming the effectiveness of the drug. All dogs will be closely monitored, and, in the event of an adverse response or unexpected issue, we would care for your dog as if they were part of our own family. Please feel free to discuss any hesitations with the treating veterinarian, and if at any time prior to treatment you decide not to enroll your dog, you can do so at no charge and with no questions asked.

 See if your dog qualifies by visiting: DogElbowPain.com

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If you feel your dog has been reluctant to jump off the couch, walk down the stairs or is overly careful jumping out of the car, he or she might be suffering from arthritis in the elbows. Even with commonly used pain medications, it is often difficult to provide long-term relief for this common condition.  
A veterinarian in your local area is participating in a  national clinical trial studying a drug for dogs suffering from arthritic elbow pain. 

The study is evaluating the short and long term (90 days) effect of this drug after a single injection in the elbow joints. This clinical trial is part of the normal FDA approval process of demonstrating that the new drug is effective and safe for use in dogs. There are no costs for pet owners related to study participation.

This study aims to confirm the effectiveness and safety of a new medicine to control pain associated with osteoarthritis of the elbow in dogs. If your dog qualifies for this study, you should expect to stay in the study for 90 days and have 7 scheduled visits with the veterinarian conducting the study. You will also be required to provide weekly behavioral assessments of your dog.

Because this is a study that is intended to support the drug’s approval, it needs to be “controlled.” This means some dogs receive treatment and others undergo the preparation and everything leading up to an injection of the medication, but do not actually receive the medication being tested. This study is also “blinded” or “masked,” meaning neither you nor the veterinarian making observations will know if your dog received the treatment or not until the end of the study. All owners of untreated dogs will be given an opportunity at the end of the study for their dogs to receive the investigational treatment at no charge.

Your dog may qualify if he or she: 
  • Is at least 1 year old.
  • Weighs more than 11 pounds.
  • Can be confirmed to have elbow pain due to osteoarthritis that impacts his/her mobility and quality of life.
  • If suffering from additional conditions other than joint pain, those conditions are stable and under medical care.
  • Is not intended for breeding and is not pregnant or lactating.
  • Has not had a medical or surgical procedure in the past 30 days.
  • Does not have acute joint pain from an infection that is being treated with antibiotics.
 
If qualified, your dog would receive (at no cost to you): 
  • Investigational medicine or the procedure without injection of the medication
  • Study-related exams and tests.
  • Time with a local veterinarian

Why should I enroll my dog in this study?

If you decide to enroll your dog in this study, he/she will receive all study-related care at no cost to you.
In addition, as participants in this study, you and your dog will be helping advance both human and veterinary medicine and treatments for future generations of owners and their animals.
Visit WWW.DOGELBOWPAIN.COM for more information
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As we close out Animal Pain Awareness Month, we wanted to leave you with some information to help you determine if your pet may be experiencing pain.  Unfortunately, pets cannot talk to us to let us know if there is a problem.  Thus, we must rely on other methods to decipher whether they are experiencing any pain.  One of the best methods to determine if your pet is in pain is to observe their behavior.

As we discussed in a recent blog, ( http://blog.vetstem.com/september-is-animal-pain-awareness-month/ )there are several causes of pain, both acute and chronic.  Acute pain may be more obvious while chronic pain may be more subtle.  Often, chronic pain is misconstrued as “getting old” but the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) is quick to point out that age is not a disease.  Pain however is a disease and pain management is important to maintain your pet’s quality of life.

So how do you know if your pet is experiencing pain?  Aside from the more obvious signs such as limping, one of the best ways to determine whether your pet may be in pain is a change in their behavior.  This can include an increase in anxiety, depression, or aggression as well as decreased social interaction or play.  Your pet may become less active or have difficulty doing things that were not a problem before.  For instance, they may have trouble getting up from lying down or they may have difficulty jumping or going up and down stairs.

Other changes may include decreased grooming, particularly for cats.  Some pets however over-groom areas of pain and may lick or bite excessively at an area that hurts.  They may also experience decreased appetite as well as changes in their bathroom habits.  Changes in posture as well as increased respiration or excessive panting can also be a sign of pain.  You can view an extensive list of symptoms for both dogs and cats on the IVAPM website. ( https://ivapm.org/common-signs-pain-dogs-cats/ )

It is important to keep an eye out for signs that your pet may be in pain.  Pain management is an invaluable tool in maintaining happy and healthy pets.  Last week, we introduced you to Veterinary Pain Specialist, Dr. Stramel at Advanced Care Veterinary Services.  While his practice focuses primarily on pain management, all veterinarians are equipped to handle painful pets in some capacity.  Your veterinarian may also be able to recommend a local Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner if you’re seeking a more in-depth approach to pain management.

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September is proclaimed as Animal Pain Awareness Month by the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM).  Keeping with our theme of pain awareness, we would like to introduce you to veterinarian and Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner, Dr. Douglas Stramel of Advanced Care Veterinary Services in Carrollton, Texas.  Dr Stramel is the first and only Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner in the Dallas/Fort Worth area and is also the President-Elect of IVAPM.

As the President of IVAPM, Dr. Stramel takes pain management very seriously and has made it a primary focus of his veterinary practice.  He employs advanced multi-modal pain management protocols including physical therapy, acupuncture, shock wave, laser therapy, and, you guessed it, regenerative medicine.

Dr. Stramel has been credentialed to perform VetStem Cell Therapy since 2007.  He is also an experienced user of Veterinary Platelet Enhancement Therapy (V-PET™).  One of his patients, a Great Dane named Pinky, received V-PET™ for a ruptured cruciate ligament last Summer.  After treatment, she was able to resume her daily walks and normal activities.  You can read Pinky’s story here.

We recently caught up with Dr. Stramel to ask him a few questions about his practice and pain awareness.  See his answers below.

What does it mean to be a Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner?

This certification indicates that someone successfully completed advanced training in pain management.  Certification holders demonstrate an advanced knowledge in assessing, diagnosing and treating painful conditions in animals. The certificate is made possible through the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) to both doctors and technicians.


How do you incorporate the use of regenerative medicine (stem cells and/or platelet therapy) into your pain practice?

In my practice, we have used regenerative medicine in many different cases, such as cruciate ligament injuries, arthritic joints, inflamed tendons and spinal injuries.  The most common use at this point in time is part of a treatment plan for cruciate ligament injuries.  We have even used Stem Cell Therapy to help reduce skin allergies.


Why is pet pain awareness so important?

Today’s pet owner is looking for alternatives to “just giving a pill” or to “surgery”.  Veterinary medicine has made some great advancements in the last 10 years and we now have the ability to help many different painful conditions that we struggled with in the past.  Client’s pets are living longer and are part of the family, they want their pets to live pain-free lives as they are living longer.  Our clients are realizing that “acting old” is not a real diagnosis and that a pet that “acts old” is really painful and they want more than just a pill to help their furry family member out.  This goes beyond the “typical” pet and includes horses, exotics, pocket pets and farm animals as well.  Through IVAPM we are advocating for best practices in the treatment of animals in pain and have selected September as Animal Pain Awareness month to correspond with Human Pain Awareness Month.

If you’re looking for a veterinary pain specialist and are in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, check out Dr. Stramel.  And thank you, Dr. Stramel, for taking the time to answer our questions!

Tune in next week as we continue our pain awareness theme to learn some of the signs and symptoms that may indicate your pet is in pain.

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POWAY, CALIF. (PRWEB) JANUARY 22, 2019

Dr. Douglas Stramel of Advanced Care Veterinary Services in Carrollton, Texas has been using the Pall Veterinary Platelet Enhancement Therapy System (V-PET™) for nearly three years. A proponent of Regenerative Medicine, Dr. Stramel has been credentialed to perform VetStem Regenerative Cell Therapy since 2007 and began using V-PET™ 2016. V-PET™ is a gravity filtration-based platelet therapy kit that produces a platelet concentrate rich in natural healing cells. Supported by veterinary peer-reviewed publications, V-PET™ has been shown to be an effective regenerative medicine solution for the treatment of joint diseasesoft tissue injuries, and to assist in the resolution of wounds in both dogs and horses.

One of Dr. Stramel’s recent patients is a Great Dane named Pinky. At seven years old and 170 pounds, Pinky is considered a senior dog. In mid-2018, Pinky slipped on a wet driveway and ruptured her cruciate ligament. She was unable to put any weight on her right rear leg, which for a dog her size, makes life pretty complicated. She could no longer go on walks and struggled to get in and out of the car. Playing could only be done while Pinky was lying on the floor. She could not go up stairs and had trouble getting on the couch and into the bed. She also struggled to go to the bathroom.

After being told surgery was Pinky’s only option, her owner, Rebecca, took Pinky to Dr. Stramel for a second opinion. As a Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner, Dr. Stramel is dedicated to providing an array of advanced pain-management techniques for his patients. For Pinky, he recommended treatment with the Pall V-PET™, in addition to acupuncture, laser therapy, and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory.

Pinky received her first platelet therapy treatment on June 26th, 2018. After a simple blood collection, Pinky’s blood was run through the specialized V-PET™ filter, which is designed to selectively capture platelets to produce a platelet concentrate. The concentrate was injected directly into Pinky’s right knee. Platelets, when exposed to damaged tissue, are triggered to release growth factors that stimulate tissue repair. Since Pinky was both the donor and recipient, there was very little risk of rejection.

According to Dr. Stramel, Pinky noticeably improved eight days after receiving platelet therapy. Beginning in July, Pinky began weekly acupuncture and biweekly laser therapy sessions. On August 2nd, Pinky received a second injection utilizing the Pall V-PET™ kit. Like before, Pinky’s blood was run through the V-PET™ filter and she received a concentrated dose of platelets into her right knee. Approximately two weeks after the second injection, Pinky was no longer limping. She received two more rounds of acupuncture and one more round of laser therapy at which point it was decided that Pinky was doing so well, she could discontinue both therapies. Currently, Pinky is maintained on one anti-inflammatory pill daily. Before and after videos of Pinky can be found here (after video in the comments).

Though Pinky was non-weight bearing on her right rear leg prior to receiving platelet therapy, her mom reported that she was able to resume all of her normal activities after treatment. She goes on three walks a day, including one walk that is always over a mile. She jumps in and out of the car with ease and has no problem with stairs. Her mom said she has also run around the backyard chasing squirrels. Though Pinky is seven years old, a senior for a dog her size, she was able to bounce back from a torn cruciate ligament with the help of Dr. Stramel and Veterinary Platelet Enhancement Therapy. Pleased with Pinky’s outcome, Rebecca stated, “I would highly recommend PRP as it was a miracle to see her recover so quickly.”

About Douglas Stramel, DVM 
Douglas Stramel received his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from Kansas State University in 1991. In 1994, he was accepted as an intern at Dallas Veterinary Surgical Center (DVSC), where he gained extensive knowledge in advanced surgical techniques. He is the first and only Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

About VetStem Biopharma, Inc. 
VetStem Biopharma is a veterinarian-lead Company that was formed in 2002 to bring regenerative medicine to the profession. This privately held biopharmaceutical enterprise, based near San Diego, California, currently offers veterinarians an autologous stem cell processing service (from patients’ own fat tissue) among other regenerative modalities. With a unique expertise acquired over the past 15 years and 17,000 treatments by veterinarians for joint, tendon or ligament issues, VetStem has made regenerative medicine applications a therapeutic reality. The VetStem team is focused on developing new clinically practical and affordable veterinary solutions that leverage the natural restorative abilities present in all living creatures. In addition to its own portfolio of patents, VetStem holds exclusive global veterinary licenses to a large portfolio of issued patents in the field of regenerative medicine.

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Animals suffer from pain just like people do. Pain comes in many forms: surgical pain, arthritis and cancer related pain, just to name a few. Acute pain is obvious and distressing. Chronic pain can be subtle, and masked as “getting old” or “slowing down.” Old age is not a disease, but pain is. There are many options to treat the various causes of pain in animals including pain medications, physical rehabilitation, acupuncture, laser therapy, and therapeutic massage.  To find a veterinarian that can help out your pet visit IVAPM.ORG

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Visit IVAPM.org to find a Pain Management Specialist near you. 

If your pet hurts, we can help. Advanced Care Veterinary Services

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Is your pet slowing down in its old age?  Is your furry companion getting slower?  Well, I am here to tell you that age is not a disease.  There is a good chance that your pet may be suffering from pain.  It is very common for painful pets to hide their pain and discomfort.  This is hardwired in their DNA and serves as a protective mechanism from the rest of the pack (dogs) or pride (cats).

It is much better for the overall health of your pet to start treating pain as soon as possible.  Too often owners wait until the pet’s issue becomes a problem for the owner and then seek help.  Some pets have been suffering for a long time, however now the owner has to pick the dog up to get it in the car or carry the cat up the steps or the pet cannot walk across the tile so they bring it in for help.  This is typically due to lack of education and understanding of pain.  Veterinarians have failed to teach owners how to properly recognize signs of pain in their pets.

Pain comes in many forms.  Acute pain can be due to surgery (TPLO for cruciate ligament) or a traumatic event (intervertebral disc rupture).  Chronic pain can come from arthritis, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, collapsed disc space, cancer, or amputation.

Besides oral and injectable medications, there are many helpful modalities that can be used to alleviate your pet’s painful condition.  Some of the modalities are Physical Therapy, Acupuncture, Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy, Laser, Joint Mobilization, Vibration Plate, Shockwave Therapy, Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Therapy, Stem Cell Therapy, Underwater Treadmill and Joint Injections.

Some of the common signs of pain in dogs are as follows:

•             Decreased social interaction

•             Anxious expression

•             Submissive behavior

•             Refusal to move

•             Whimpering

•             Howling

•             Growling

•             Guarding behavior

•             Aggression, biting

•             Decreased appetite

•             Self-mutilation (chewing)

•             Changes in posture

 

Some of the common signs of pain in cats are as follows:

•             Reduced activity

•             Loss of appetite

•             Quiet/loss of curiosity

•             Defecating outside the litter box

•             Hiding

•             Hissing or spitting

•             Lack of agility/jumping

•             Excessive licking/grooming

•             Stiff posture/gait

•             Guarding behavior

•             Stops grooming/matted fur

•             Tail flicking

•             Weight loss

If you have any questions about your pet and how we can help manage their pain, please do not hesitate to contact us.  If your pet hurts, we can help!

Advanced Care Veterinary Services: 972-394-6422 or www.stoppetpain.com